farahmoans

I’m getting a crush on John Oliver.

Part of the value of a humanistic education has to do with a consciousness of, and a familiarity with, the limits that you’ll spend the rest of your life talking about and pushing against. So it’s probably natural for college students to be a little ironic, a little unsettled.

Just as I believe in blaming capitalism for the financial situation of those on welfare, I believe in blaming the age we live in for why I am so annoying.

Growing up, I didn’t read novels by women. It’s not that I didn’t want to. It’s almost like I didn’t think that I needed to or, I guess, I didn’t know that I needed to. I was perfectly happy in a world contained by men. I adopted the posture of the brooding male as my own. I was Salinger, I was Kerouac, I was any male protagonist in a novel that one of my boyfriends recommended. I didn’t know that there was a specific female sadness so I was content with relating to a generalized one. And in a way, reading these novels was less of a way to relate and more of a way to learn how to be the type of girl that these male novelists liked. One of my first ambitions wasn’t to be a writer – it was to be a writer’s muse.
Gabby Bess, in Dazed
I’ve got a new idol.

I’ve got a new idol.

I’m glad this article was written. Everyone I’ve heard from is raving about the new pantene ad but I don’t like that it’s trying to stop women’s use of the word “sorry.”

It’s a conscientiousness device. The reason women use it more is the reason that women are more conscientious in social interactions.

Prime example of a case where men should adopt a female practice instead of vice-versa. I’d love a world where more men say “sorry.”

My indebtedness to institutions and individuals is uncomfortably high in relation to the results.
Maybe my favourite preface to a book.
From Nelson Goodman’s Languages of Art.

It’s not feminist, but as a feminist, I fucking love making fun of white dudes.